Those suffering from Parkinson’s Disease are subject to a symptom that involves tremors. This takes place when the dopamine levels in the brain drop. Some treatments revolve around the replenishment of dopamine in the brain. When the neurons that produce dopamine in the brain die, the patient suffers from frequent tremors.

Joon Faii Ong – Joining hands with leading neurosurgeons and specialists in movement disorders

Joon Faii Ong from Harvard Medical Schoolis the Founder of GyroGear, an esteemed name in the UK’s medical and healthcare industry. The dedicated team of medical specialists here comprises engineers, medics, and designers committed to helping individuals diagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease and Essential Tremor to retore and boost their dignity, independence, and quality of life with success.

They have recently invented the GyroGlove, a breakthrough product that helps people with Parkinson’s Disease control the occurrences of tremors. When it comes to an understanding of tremor, it refers to a quivering movement or a shake of the body that is done involuntarily. This generally takes place when the body of the individual is at rest.

What are these tremors, and how do they affect the quality of life of a person?

This movement or shaking of the body is slow and rhythmic. It generally begins in the hand or the foot to gradually spread to the individual’s whole body. The tremor might also arise in the chin, jaw, mouth, or tongue of the person. There can be tremors that take place internally and might not be noticed by others.

Tremors are quite common in individuals that suffer from Parkinson’s Disease. It affects about 80% of people that are afflicted with the disease. Many individuals believe that these tremors are the biggest problem with Parkinson’s Disease; however, medical experts say that these tremors are not deliberating for most people, and this does not mean that their daily life tasks are severely affected.

The only concern that people have is these tremors are really annoying as they attract attention. This is why you often see people keep their hands in their pockets or even need to sit on their hands to control the tremors. These tremors often are not noticed with movement, and as mentioned above, they do not necessarily interfere with daily chores.

These tremors are generally asymmetrical in nature. This means if one side of the body has them, the other side of the body doesn’t need to face them too. There are several cases where people have tremors only on one side of their bodies for life. Generally, they begin in the hands, reach the jaws, go to the feet, and travel in this order.

According to Joon Faii Ong the tremors that one experiences in Parkinson’s Disease are different from other sorts of tremors because it takes place when a person is at rest. This is why it is often referred to as a “resting tremor.” These tremors come, and they go away. They return to the limbs like the hand, foot, or fingers when they are in a single position. This is why those with Parkinson’s Disease are prone to spill or drop things frequently.